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Bogus Win10 Printer Update Alerts

If you’re running the latest Win10 version (Fall Creators Update Version 1709) and automate Update retrieval, you may be offered bogus printer drivers. Tools like the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit, aka MDT, or even the Windows Update MiniTool, aka WUMT, show Windows 10 images needing print drivers. At the same time, plain-vanilla Windows Update shows no such lack. That makes me label these items as bogus Win10 printer update alerts.

What Do Bogus Win10 Printer Update Alerts Look Like?

The following screen shot from WUMT appeared on one of my test machines this morning. I also observed those drivers failed to install. This TenForums thread applies: “Can’t get rid of Printer-6/21/2006 12:00:00 AM 10.0.15063.0 update.” That’s where I learned that what WUMT showed me also shows up in MDT for others. I expect that means it’ll show up in System Center Configuration Manager, the Windows ADK, SmartDeploy, ENGL Imaging Toolkit, and so forth. It seems to apply only to packages with automated Windows Update checks.

Bogus Win10 Printer Update Alerts

Closer investigation reveals the Print to PDF driver first, aand the XPS print driver second.

As it happens, neither of those print drivers is essential to proper print output anyway. The first one comes into play for the “Print to PDF option” in Office components and other applications. The second driver is an extension of the GDI-based Version 3 printer driver. It goes back to the pre-Vista Windows era (and is seldom used today).  Thus, you can cheerfully ignore these offerings in most situations.

That’s why I elected to hide both drivers inside the WUMT interface. Because the program was happy to do just that, I won’t be bothered with this particular driver offer again. YMMV, depending on which deployment tool you’re using for Windows 10. According to one poster to the afore-cited TenForums thread, enabling continuation on error for updates in MDT allows deployment to proceed. It slows things down a bit, though, so consider yourself warned.

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