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Cumulative Updates Increment Win10 Build Numbers: Implications?

On 11/18, later in the day, my Win10 systems picked up a new cumulative update: KB3118754. What made this update interesting was that it led to an increment in the Windows 10 Version number suffix, as shown in this screen capture from the Winver command:

winver-10586.11

Following application of KB 3118754, the Build number went from 10586.3 to 10586.11.

After the recent application of the Threshold 2 update last week, the version number stood at 10586.3, and the software made available through MSDN and the Windows 10 Download (Media Creation Tool) was updated likewise. With the change in version number, I found myself wondering if this meant that the versions published through those outlets would also be changed to follow suit. A quick check on MSDN showed the pub date for the version available there remained fixed at 11/12 (the day before the Threshold 2/November 1511 update was pushed out through WU):

msdn-10586.3

No change to the most current available MSDN version for Windows 10.

Just for grins, I downloaded another copy of Windows 10 from the afore-linked download page, and used the Media Creation Tool to build another Windows 10 installer UFD. Taking advantage of the info from my previous blog post, I used DISM to give me version info from the .esd file on that media, and saw no change in version info there, either.

I’m glad to understand that we can track versions for Windows 10 more precisely now, but that this doesn’t mean a constant need to update installer and/or repair/recovery media to track those frequent version number changes. I guess the difference between the current baseline version as defined by those items and the current actual version as defined by the most recent cumulative update will instead stand as a rough-and-ready metric for how many updates will need to be applied to the baseline version of Windows 10, should one be required to perform a refresh, reset, or in-place upgrade by way of repair.

The Windows 10 adventure continues, as we all learn the new and emerging rules of the road that are unfolding before us. Let’s hope we can keep making sense of what’s happening as those changes keep coming!

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