News Stay informed about the latest enterprise technology news and product updates.

Another DISM tip for compacting Windows installations

While perusing the postings over at the Windows 10 Forums earlier, I caught an item there entitled “Trimming down Win10TP” that taught me a new way to use the Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool (aka DISM). According to the DISM reference on TechNet, it involves adding a couple of different switches to the by-now-familiar DISM /online /cleanup-image sequence.

shutterstock_223942717

Lots of building blocks go into Windows images, so lots of blocks can be (occasionally) cleaned-up.

[Image Credit: Shutterstock 223942717 © IndianSummer]

Those two switches are

1. /StartComponentCleanup, which TechNet explains as intended “to clean up the superseded components and reduce the size of the component store” (WinSXS).
2. /ResetBase, which TechNet explains as intended “to reset the base of superseded components, which can further reduce the component store size.”

Nothing loath, I tried them both! I’ve already cleaned up my driver store, and gotten rid of leftover update detritus and Windows.old installations on all these machines, but I did get from just under 1 GB to 2.1 GB back on the various machines I tried it on, including both Windows 8.1 and 10 (Build 10122) installations. Here’s a short table of results:

Results of running DISM to clean Component Store (WinSXS)
Machine Brief stats OS B4 C: size (GB) After C: size
Dell Venue 11 Pro i5/8GB RAM/256GB SSD Win10 36.9 34.8
i7-4770K Desktop i7/32GB RAM/256GB SSD Win10 69.9 68.3
Production desktop i7/32GB RAM/500GB SSD Win8.1 98.7 97.9
Surface Pro 3 i7/8GB RAM/256GB SSD Win8.1 60.4 59.9

I wouldn’t call these earth-shattering space savings, but any time you can save another gig (sometimes more) of space, and tidy up Windows at the same time, I’m inclined to endorse the activity involved. I can also say it took a great deal longer for Windows 8.1 to crank its way through the work involved in this clean-up as compared to Windows 10. On the Win10 PCs it took under two minutes to finish up, on each of the Windows 8.1 PCs it took between 5 and 10 minutes to complete.

There’s a caveat to keep in mind, too: If you run the /ResetBase switch, you will thenceforth be unable to roll back any Windows Updates installed on that PC. This has yet to bite me on the hindquarters, but it is worth remembering, especially in corporate environments, where updates are carefully and cautiously applied anyway.

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchVirtualDesktop

SearchWindowsServer

Close