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Build 10586/1511 Makes Its Debut: Lessons Learned

Early yesterday morning (11/12), some of my Build 10240 Windows 10 PCs began offering access to the 10586/1511 Build. Throughout the course of the day, I was slowly but surely able to get most of my 10240 PCs upgraded to the latest Windows 10 version. Along the way, as is so often the case with things related to Windows, I learned a few things: some came with relative ease, others required a bit of elbow grease to work my way through. Here is my report, prefaced with the new OS information that shows up in Settings/System/About:

w10-1511-about

The new OS shows 1511 as the version, with 10586.3 as the Build number.

The information that came relatively easily on the upgrade/update path was as follows:

For those machines that were offered the upgrade through Windows Update, download and application went fairly quickly (10-15 minutes, on average) for each machine. I encountered no significant problems on any of those machine, though my Surface Pro 3 did come up with Airplane Mode turned on after the first post-install boot into the new OS, a minor hiccup that was quickly remedied by turning it off immediately. No device driver issues cropped up on any of the half-dozen machines I’ve upgraded so far.

Some machines did not show the 1511 upgrade notice (depiction follows) quickly enough to suit me — I’ve since learned that for machines more recently upgraded to Windows 10 10240, the 30-day rollback period must first expire before this upgrade will be offered via WU — so I jumped over to MSDN to download the ISO file for the latest x64 build (the same versions are now available through the Media Creation Tool page as well). I used Rufus 2.5 to create a bootable UFD that will also serve for repair/clean install, and ran the setup.exe program to successfully perform in-place upgrades for all the machines that didn’t get offered the update through WU.

1511-notice

Here’s what the upgrade item looks like in Settings, if/when it’s offered.

Some Things We Learn Unwillingly, Because We Have No Choice!
On one of my PCs — my production PC, in fact, as fate would have it — I encountered an install error I’d never seen before. The Windows installer refused to let me perform an in-place upgrade (keep files and apps) because there was a language mismatch between the installer I’d built and the version running on the target PC. Further investigation showed me that I could use the DISM command to obtain that information, as follows:

ui-lang-reset

I learned that the default UI language for my production PC installation is en-GB (British English) and that, by implication, I couldn’t use the en-US (American English) installer to perform an in-place upgrade. Furthermore, I also learned (see error information in second DISM command above) that you can’t reset the default UI language on an online image, only on an offline one. Rather than learning how to take my current installed image offline to perform the necessary alteration (my research shows me this can be done using a repair install boot, then running the necessary DISM command through a Command Line Prompt from the Advanced Options section in Repair), I simply jumped back up to MSDN, grabbed the UK version of the installer, and built myself a second UFD using Rufus to perform the in-place upgrade. This went without a hitch, and my production machine is now humming along on Version 1511 (I’m writing this blog post on that very machine right now).

All’s Well That Ends Well
Now that I’m mostly finished with the upgrade process (I’m planning to upgrade my wife’s and son’s computers over the weekend) I can report a high degree of success and satisfaction with the new 1511 OS version on all machines. The only real snag I hit was of my own making (having apparently run the wrong installer for en-GB on the production PC at some time in the past, probably for Windows 8 or 8.1 some time ago), and even that was easy to overcome as soon as I figured out what was amiss. “So far, so good,” is my current assessment, as I start digging more deeply into the ins and outs of this latest version, outside the two test machines — my i7 2600K desktop, and my Dell Venue Pro 11 7139 — where I’ve been running something very close to this image for a couple of weeks now.

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Looks like I have time to upgrade my 2 remaining PCs right now, so that's what I'll do. More info to follow if other lessons get learned along that part of the upgrade path!
--Ed--
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