Manage Learn to apply best practices and optimize your operations.

Out Darned Win10 Dollar Files!

Checking over my production PC this weekend, I noticed a half-dozen folders at the root of my system drive (C:). By definition such files are system related and ordinarily hidden from view. Looking them over, I quickly realized I neither wanted or needed most of them. Hence my exhortation: Out darned Win10 dollar files (with apologies to the Immortal Bard). Here’s what I saw at the head of the C: drive’s folder list (the initial $ takes them to the head of the collating sequence):

Note the list of items here, each starting with the dollar-sign ($) character.
[Click image for full-sized view.]

Tossing Out Darned Win10 Dollar Files

Let’s tackle each item in the foregoing list of hidden system files as they appear from the top down. I’ll dig a bit into each one, and explain why I decided to get rid of 5 of those 6 entries. Sometimes that means I don’t need the contents any more, sometimes it’s an empty directory somehow left behind by Disk Clean up or Settings → Storage → Free Up Space now. Actually, only the Recycle Bin is a must-keep item (it supports the familiar desktop trashcan).

$GetCurrent

This hidden folder is created on Windows 10 machines during the upgrade process. It contains log files about a specific upgrade, in fact. The files in this folder are dated April 30, 2018, which means they’re tied to the 1803 upgrade. I’m running 1809 on this PC, so I absolutely don’t need this folder any more. Out it goes.

$Hyper-V.tmp

There’s little or no information about the $Hyper-V.tmp folder available anywhere, either from Microsoft or third parties. Its extension — .tmp — usually indicates temporary files which means it’s not necessary to keep them around. Closer inspection of the folder shows it to be empty. I’m not running Hyper-V on this PC anyway. Out it goes, too.

$Recycle.Bin

This one’s legit and must be kept around to keep the Windows 10 Recycle Bin working as intended. I’m leaving one alone, and you probably should, too.

$SysReset

According to a variety of sources, the $SysReset folder is created only when a Reset or Refresh operation fails on a PC. Since I regularly mess around with system functions on this PC for research and learning purposes, I probably triggered it unintentionally at one time or another. It includes log files intended to help troubleshooting reset and refresh issues. I have none that I know of, so this one goes, too.

$Windows.~BT and $Windows.~WS

These folders are created during the upgrade process to support rollback if needed. I use image backups to roll back when necessary, so I don’t need these folders. I’m not sure why Disk Cleanup and/or Settings → Storage → Free Up Space hasn’t already removed them, but I have no qualms about doing this manually myself. I don’t need these folders, nor their contents. Besides, 1809 backup happened for me on October 5 at Build 17763.1, and no longer matches the official ISO build source 17763.134. I don’t even want this stuff. Out it goes!

Say Bye to those Dollar Files

In an administrative Command Prompt session within PowerShell, I’ll use the rd (remove directory) command with /s (recurse directories) and /q (quiet, ignore error messages) to tackle these items. Here goes:

As I entered these commands inside the PowerShell/Cmd window, I watched the corresponding folders disappear in Explorer. Cool!

All taken care of. If it worked for me, it will also work for you. Say G’bye now!

SearchVirtualDesktop

SearchWindowsServer

Close