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Windows 8.1 user interface improves on previous Windows 8 features

5/9

Windows 8 Snap includes improvements

Source:  Brien Posey

Windows 8 was distinguished from other tablet OSes such as iOS because it enabled multitasking by running two apps on screen at once. Microsoft referred to this capability as Snap. The problem with Snap however, was that it supported only two simultaneous apps, and you couldn't adjust the window sizes.

Windows 8.1 has dramatically improved Snap by allowing multiple apps to be viewed at once (your display resolution is the limiting factor). You can also adjust the size of each window rather than being limited by the operating system controlling the display size. Here, you can see three apps on the screen at once.

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You say: "Windows 8.1 has dramatically improved Snap by allowing multiple apps to be viewed at once (your display resolution is the limiting factor). You can also adjust the size of each window rather than being limited by the operating system controlling the display size. Here, you can see three apps on the screen at once."

I say: "Taking away capabilities that were available in Win XP, Win 95, etc. and then
only partially giving them back is an improvement only in the mind of seriously narcissistic personalties. Here I sit with Win XP, with 8 windows open, and I wonder
how in the world Win 8.1 can be proud of 'quote unquote' "allowing" three windows to be seen? Just give back ALL the capabilities of Win XP, then get rid of the annoyances, and then may be we'll talk."
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Here is a general comment: It appears that Microsoft gets "all new untested people and locks them in a room to develop a new OS". As a result, these people don't know what the users of prior Operating Systems like and don't like. They therefore proceed to reinvent the wheel, and are incapable of "keeping what works". The process of deciding what features are included is quite flawed in that Microsoft seems to take a
not to well founded numerical research approach. They wrongly conclude that a function that is "only used by e.g. 10% of users" is "not worth it". They don't see that by excluding for example 7 functions that were used by only 10% of users, that these 10% of users do not necessarily overlap, and thus it happens that, in this example, they insult and disappoint indeed, UP TO 70% OF PRIOR USERS. If you kindly think this through, you can see why Win 8 was a problem.
What I don't understand is that Microsoft does not seem to learn anything from
prior such missteps.
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